So I chose Business Central … But am I losing my Dynamics GP data?

In the last 6 months I’ve been involved with a number of GP to BC migration projects.

A recurring question that reaches our team is how do I see GP data in BC?

One avenue to move your business to BC is to import open transactions and master data, and tested setup tables with RapidStart packages. If the underlying table of the desired GP entity does not exist in BC, then a Business Central developer would need to create the table in BC and, with Edit In Excel functionality you can get GP data in BC.

There is also the Cloud Migration Tool in BC. More about it here.

Using this tool ensures the most important entities, master data and open transactions, will make it into BC. But what if a GP end-user wants additional GP data in BC?

Microsoft recommendation is to bring as little as possible into the cloud from an on-premise database.

Moreover, as your database capacity increases, your cost can increase. See more here.

Rather than bringing GP tables one by one in BC, use the cloud migration tool to move data from GP to Azure Data Lake.

If the decision is, though, to have some GP data in Business Central, there are tools to make that possible.

We can extend the cloud migration tool so that, when the migration starts, beside the core migrated data (master data and open transactions) the process will also bring into a new space (an extension table) the data from the GP table as mapped in the “Manage Custom Tables” page.

What’s needed to achieve this:

  • Create a Business Central extension. In it, create an AL table to store your data from a GP table
  • Add the custom table in Manage Custom Tables
  • Run migration tool
  • Check custom table content after migration

Let’s try bringing table GL00100 from GP in BC.

Note: this table was chosen only for demonstration. GL00100 is brought by default by the cloud migration tool into BC table “G/L Account”.

Create extension with GP table

I created an extension that includes a table for this GP entity:

Map migration for new table in “Cloud Migration Management”

In Business Central, search for “Cloud Migration Management”.

Under actions trigger “Manage Custom Tables” action:

Under “Migration Table Mapping” page, map new table in your extension to the GP table:

On “Migration Cloud Management” trigger the “Run Migration Now” action.

You can check the results in the cue on the Migration Information area:

To check the content migrated:

  • change the company to the migrated company
  • run the new table by adding “&Table= 50340” to the Business Central URL:

We can now see the result of migrating the GP data to the custom BC table:

Conclusion

To answer the question in the title, you don’t lose GP data. There are multiple ways of accessing your GP data post go-live to BC, involving:

  • retaining the access to your old system
  • migrate your Dynamics GP installation to Azure (SQL Server and application)
  • migrating your GP data warehouse to Azure Data Lake
  • or, as shown above, with minimal coding, keeping your GP data in Business Central

Engage with your partner and decide what GP data do you really need today so that long term your cloud ERP stays performant.

Export Business Central online entities to Azure storage blob container

As most probably know, it is not possible to access the file system while in Business Central cloud environment.

For example, in Dynamics NAV, we could have a job queue entry that, when run, creates a file and copies it in a network folder. We can still do that in an On-Premise environment, but not with cloud BC.

You could create the file and use DownloadFromStream, but that would only prompt you do download it locally, but would not copy it somewhere on a local or network folder.

If you try to use File.Create() you would get the warning: “The type or method ‘Create’ cannot be used for ‘Extension’ development”.

If your customer is happy to grab the file manually every time from the downloads folder then this should suffice:

But, if we want to automatize this process and run the extract on a regular basis, we need to find a cloud solution for storing the files.

Currently, there are 4 types of storage in Azure platform:

  • Containers/Blobs
  • File Shares
  • Queues
  • Tables

In my previous blog I dived into the Azure Storage of type Tables and tackled its API.

This blog is about interacting with the Azure storage blob containers:

  • manually, via Azure Portal
  • simulation, via VS Code extension “Rest Client”
  • Business Central extension
  • view blob container with Excel
  • get Azure Blobs locally

I found on Michael Megel’s blog a nice solution for exactly what I need. Awesome job on Blob Containers API, Michael! Thank you for sharing!

What I need:

  • Azure:
    • Set up a blob container to store Business Central exported files
    • Set up Storage Access Key
  • Simulation:
    • In VS Code, write requests with “Rest Client” extension, targeting Azure blob container API
  • Business Central:
    • A setup table in Business Central for Azure access stuff
    • Wrote an export interface that would allow users to run an action(“Write File in Azure”) that will send the extract to Azure container. The same code could be executed by a job queue.

Blob Container Setup

To set up a container, following Michael’s notes on above blog was enough for me.

For blob container accessibility I went on the path of shared access signature “SAS Token”.

Once created, you can start playing with the storage account container API.

I created the storage manually:

Drilling down into the storage account, I created a new container:

Simulation:

In VS Code, using Rest Client,

  1. I sent a request to get the list of containers:

Request:

GET https://svflorida.blob.core.windows.net/?comp=list&%5Bhere you insert your SAS token key]

content-type: application/json

Response:

HTTP/1.1 201 Created

Content-Length: 0

Content-MD5: 1B2M2Y8AsgTpgAmY7PhCfg==

Last-Modified: Wed, 18 Aug 2021 19:05:13 GMT

ETag: “0x8D9627B1BD88A0F”

Server: Windows-Azure-Blob/1.0 Microsoft-HTTPAPI/2.0

x-ms-request-id: 3f97555d-801e-006d-5263-94f646000000

x-ms-version: 2020-08-04

x-ms-content-crc64: AAAAAAAAAAA=

x-ms-request-server-encrypted: true

Date: Wed, 18 Aug 2021 19:05:13 GMT

Connection: close

2. I sent a PUT request to insert an empty file:

Request:

PUT https://svflorida.blob.core.windows.net/vendorlist/vl1111?%5Byour SAS token here]

x-ms-blob-type: BlockBlob

Content-Length: 0

Response:

HTTP/1.1 201 Created

Content-Length: 0

Content-MD5: 1B2M2Y8AsgTpgAmY7PhCfg==

Last-Modified: Wed, 18 Aug 2021 19:23:46 GMT

ETag: “0x8D9627DB340E9DD”

Server: Windows-Azure-Blob/1.0 Microsoft-HTTPAPI/2.0

x-ms-request-id: b77cbfb2-b01e-003b-2566-9407a9000000

x-ms-version: 2020-08-04

x-ms-content-crc64: AAAAAAAAAAA=

x-ms-request-server-encrypted: true Date: Wed, 18 Aug 2021 19:23:46 GMT

Connection: close

And this is the file in Azure portal:

Business Central extension:

This is how the new setup table “Azure Storage Setup” looks in BC:

This is how the new BC interface “Vendors Export Log” looks like:

“Write File In Azure” action on page 50251 “Vendor Export Log” does the following:

  • exports all BC vendors to a blob
  • the blob is then written to a PUT request content
  • the PUT request is sent to Azure Blob Storage API

Consult Blobs with Excel:

BC users can click on the URL link above and download locally the file or they, and other 3rd party users, can access the files via Excel, as I explained in my previous blog.

This time though, when creating the connection choose Data – > Get Data -> From Azure -> From Azure Blob Storage.

And finally displayed in the Excel book:

Get Azure Blobs locally

To help with getting the files locally, I wrote 2 blogs:

  • one about getting the files locally using Power Automate
  • one about Azure CLI to copy the files from azure blob storage locally

For more about storage accounts in Azure check this out.

You can find sample code repository here.

Copy files from Azure Blob Storage to File System (using Power Automate)

I found an older post on community.dynamics.com in which someone was asking for ways to automatically drop data extracts originated in BC SaaS into a local folder.

First, in SaaS, we can’t generate the files automatically and store them locally.

We need to store them in the cloud.

Once in the cloud, how can we automatically download them locally on a machine or a network folder?

I bing-ed the phrase “copy files from azure blob storage to file system” and the first search result was this link to a Power Automate template flow:

There are a multitude of cloud providers, but Microsoft does continuously a great job at connecting everything between BC SaaS, Azure platform, Power Automate and Power Apps, so it’s just convenient to use its tools.

To test it, I went through the following exercise:

  • In Azure Platform I created a storage account and in it I created a Blob Container.
    • “A container organizes a set of blobs, similar to a directory in a file system. A storage account can include an unlimited number of containers, and a container can store an unlimited number of blobs.”
  • I created a local folder that will be synchronized by the new flow with the container in Azure

In Power Automate, I started with the Template provided by Microsoft and set up the flow:

The flow requires two connectors to be set up:

  • one to the azure storage container
  • one to the local or network folder

Editing Azure Blob Storage we see that we need the name of the azure storage, in my case “svflorida” and storage access key:

Storage access key is located in in azure portal under Access Keys:

Editing the File System Connector:

The most time consuming, about half an hour, was to set up and troubleshooting the gateway.

The flow cannot just drop files from Azure on your machine. It needs a gateway.

To create a new gateway, click on the drop down and choose “+ New on-premises data gateway”.

That will prompt you to download an msi to install a gateway: GatewayInstall.msi.

Once gateway installed, the only change I’ve operated was to switch from HTTPS to TCP:

In a live environment I would investigate and maybe set up an Azure Service Bus, but for the purpose of this exercise I went with TCP.

Once that is done the flow will be triggered when new files are uploaded or deleted from the Azure Container.

I noticed that with my free trial license the recurrence of the flow was set to 3 minutes.

The flow seems to pick changes as expected, just be patient and wait for the next run 🙂

In azure portal, upload a new file into your container:

The file will appear after a few minutes in your local folder:

And the flow shows a successful run:

That’s it! In the next blog I will look into how I can generate BC SaaS extracts into an Azure storage container so the flow doesn’t feel useless 🙂

I hope this helps someone. In any way, it’s late here so I call it a night!

Azure Storage Table and its API

One way to make available data from Business Central to different parties and users is to leverage Azure Storage.

Customers will need to have an Azure Portal subscription.

There are 4 types of storage in Azure portal: Blob Containers, File Shares, Queues, and Tables.

Today’s blog is about Azure Storage Tables and its API.

More on its API here.

In this blog I covered:

  • create a storage account table using Azure Platform;
  • insert data in the storage account table via VS Code extension “Rest Client”;
  • an extension to send Business Central vendor data to the Azure Storage table;
  • using Excel to share Azure Storage table data with 3rd party users.

Create storage account and storage account table

I created through the Azure portal one storage account and a few tables stored inside that storage account.

The process is simple and you can find details about storage accounts here and an overview on storage account tables here.

You can insert manually data in these tables using Azure Storage Explorer.

Let’s see how we can interact with them first via Rest Client (extension for VS Code), and then via Business Central extensions.

Using Rest Client to interact with Azure Storage Table

1. we can query the Azure Tables via Rest Client in VS Code:

[in the picture insert your SAS token right after “?”]

2. Query Vendor table:

3. Insert new record in Vendor Table:

Let’s now verify in Azure portal the last action:

Use Azure Storage Table API from Business Central

With the API tested, let’s now move to Business Central and AL and try to insert records in the Azure tables.

The sample code I worked on will scan all vendors and send Vendor.”No.” and Vendor.Name to the Vendor table in Azure Storage.

When creating a new table in Azure Storage Table, each table comes by default with the 2 fields:

  • PartitionKey
  • RowKey

In my example, PartitionKey will be empty, but you could populate it with the company name.

RowKey will be populated with Vendor.SystemId.

“Azure Storage Setup” it’s an extension table to keep all that great Azure stuff:

To log the work done by the Post request I created table and a page and I am inserting records in this table with each successful Post request.

Use the Azure Storage Explorer to view records in the Azure Portal:

What about the 3rd party users?

How do we give them access to the data in the storage table?

The good old Excel is here to contribute.

Use of Excel to share Azure Storage Data with 3rd party users

-Open Excel

  • go to Data menu
  • Get Data -> From Azure Storage Table
  • when prompted enter for the “Account Name or URL” enter the storage URL:
  • For access key enter the access key from storage account

And this is what we get:

Click on Load, and then double click on Vendor Connection:

PowerQuery is opening and we can enable the other fields (by clicking on Content column and select the missing columns):

You can find the AL sample code here.

To use or not to use SelectLatestVersion()

When using web services or API exposed entities you might find useful to request the application service to grab the latest version of the underlying data.

The definition at Database.SelectLatestVersion Method – Business Central | Microsoft Docs states that with using SelectLatestVersion() function you make sure that “the data displayed is the most current data in the database”.

Why would we do that? Isn’t the browser page automatically refreshed?

Not always. Not when a 3rd party up updates the records.

Let’s do some tests in a SaaS environment.

I created a custom entity (testTable), with a list page and an API page. Will start with pushing 10 records to the table via a batch using Postman:

This is the result when executing “refresh” action:

And now let’s send another batch with 4 Delete request:

Next, I’m going to send another 10 records batch to BC.

Using a new action, “refresh-SelectLatestVersion” that does not contain SelectLatestVersion() gives us the following:

It appears that SelectLatestVersion does not make any difference in SaaS and that affecting records with a BC native API does not require SelectLatestVersion().

Let’s try something similar in an On-prem installation.

When records are updated by other apps, not through Business Central means (by the way, not a great idea), the page is not notified of changes in the underlying data and therefore is in a stale state.

How can we enforce the data to update?

Using SelectLatestVersion() we’re clearing up the client cache for the underlying table, initiating a new Read transaction for the affected table, thus affecting performance.

Let’s see how much is actually taking the server to grab the latest data.

I inserted via T-SQL 1,000,000 records:

and this is what I’ve got when I refreshed the page:

The I removed all records:

As you can see above, while my CurrPage.Update is before Message, the page still shows the records. I am guessing that the Message gets displayed before the page is re-rendered.

After clicking on OK the page get rendered again and shows 0 records.

It took 69 milliseconds but the table had only 2 fields. With more fields the result might take longer.

Sometimes customers will ask for an auto-refresh page. While there are technical means to satisfy the request, we need to recognize that this comes with a price, hurting performance. And when applying an auto-refresh to multiple pages the price consequently multiplies.

Things to consider:

  1. avoid when possible use of Selectlatestversion on prem.
  2. In SaaS no need for SelectLatestVersion, refreshing the page via an action or browser F5 displays the latest data.
  3. avoid auto-refreshing. Rather go with a manual refresh(action on page to refresh and call SelectLatestVersion) than auto-refresh (a timer controladdin)
  4. To decrease the number of SelectLatestVersion() calls and CurrPage.Update, log your refresh triggers (count and refresh datetime), and compare current count against last refresh count, get the maximum System Modified At among your records and compare it against your last log datetime …

Extension code for SaaS is located here.

Business Central : Word Layout date fields formatting

One of my co-workers asked how can we format a date field in a MS Word Layout document so that it only shows the date but not the time.

To get started with adding fields to a Word Report Layout start with this:

How to Add Fields to a Word Report Layout – Business Central | Microsoft Docs

Let’s say you added a date field: CustomDate to a BC report.

When you run the report the date field renders on the report as DateTime: 30-06-2021 12:00:00.

How do we enforce the report to only display the date: 30-06-2021

Let’s look at a simple example: you want to add to the report 206, Sales Invoice, in a custom Word Layout the DueDate_SalesInvHeader field from the dataset.

If you followed the link above you might have now a control on your document that looks like this:

If this field is coming from AL with Date and Time components, how do we format it so it only shows the Date?

In RDLC you would go to the properties of the text box that is hosting your datetime field and change the Format property to “d”.

How about Word Layouts?

It’s quite simple, but not easily available in the documentation.

You would change the date field in the layout to show like this:

You can change the formatting to match your region. In US: dd/MM/yyyy.

There is always the option of writing an extension and send to layout an already formatted date field as text.

Business Central On-Premise installation: hardware and software requirements and recommendations

A list of system requirements for Business Central On-Premise is readily available from Microsoft Docs here.

The only issue is, these are bare minimum requirements.

How do we know what level of hardware requirements will be enough to not only guarantee good performance at deployment, but down the line months and years from deployment?

When the decision to go for Business Central On-Premise versus Business Central on Microsoft cloud is behind, end-users and VARs alike are facing decisions regarding the server type: should it be dedicated server in End-Users premises or virtual servers.

If going down the virtual server path, End-Users can chose between a self-managed self-hosted virtualization system (using Hyper-V or other alike solutions) or use a cloud provider(one of them being Microsoft’s Azure platform).

The minimum requirements allow for an installation of standard product. But if the company is using a different Application layer (standard + AddOns) or if the installation needs to accommodate various extensions, minimum requirements won’t be enough.

For example, in my recent experience with 2 VARs with products for Food vertical, the Microsoft Application extension has been replaced with code that includes Microsoft Application and Food application code. There are high chances that the minimum requirements won’t be satisfied by the modified base layer of the application. And with additional extensions installed on top of the base layer, our needs are getting further and further away from the bare minimum requirements.

When we need to research about Business Central requirements we need to understand the architecture of this product. Business Central functions on a three-tier architecture as seen on this Microsoft Docs page:

Each component in this model comes with their own hardware/software recommendations.

More often than not, I have seen the Web Server and the Business Central server side by side on the same server.

Quite often, especially for installations with less than 25 users, I’ve seen installations of SQL Server, NAV Server and Web Server all on 1 machine or virtual machine.

For installation of 25 users or less the topology I’ve seen working quite well is this:

  • Business Central Server + Web Server on one machine
  • SQL Server on a different machine

Business Central Server and Web Server

SpecificationMinimumRecommended
Memory16 GB>= 32 GB
Processor1 Quad Core2 x 16 CPU cores
DisksSAS or SSD Drives, configured with RAID1

For a list of Operating Systems required by Business Central Server visit Microsoft Docs recommendations for Operating System.

SQL Server

SpecificationMinimumRecommended
Memory32 GB>= 64 GB
Processor1 Quad Core 2 x 16 CPU cores
Disks SAS or SSD Drives:
– OS: RAID1
– Data drive: RAID1
– Log drive: RAID1/RAID10
– Master/TempDB: RAID1
– Backup drive: RAID1

Most SQL Server installations use SQL Server Standard.

While I’ve seen installations of Microsoft Dynamics NAV and Business Central on a SQL Server express platform, SQL Server Express should only be deployed for non-production use such as test or development environments. It is not fit as a live environment’s production server.

For a list of SQL Server OS recommendations visit Microsoft Docs page.

The three tier architecture includes:

  • Web Clients
  • Business Central mobile app
  • MS Office Applications (needed for integration of BC with Office products)
  • AL Development workstations.

Please visit Microsoft Docs for each of these additional components’ operating system and other required software recommendation.

MB-800 Business Central Functional Consultant exam : study materials

As a Business Central developer I don’t get every day to set up Business Central standard processes, I mostly design and setup the processes in my customizations work. Standard Business Central setup is covered by Functional Consultants.

The exam MB-800 has been active for about a year (beta version started in October 2020) and given my developer experience with setting up the system I thought I’d give it a try. This blog contains materials I found, read, and tested; hopefully it will provide a good starting point for study for others.

This exam is testing your skills on setting up Business Central SaaS. It is easy to get a trial of BC SaaS which can be used for training for this exam. And if you need more time, you can extend your trial by another 30 days. Just navigate to https://businesscentral.dynamics.com/?page=1828 and extend your trial. If 60 days is not enough, you can start again a new trial.

You should start with Exam MB-800: Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central Functional Consultant – Learn | Microsoft Docs.

That page offers:

For example, one learning path is Set up financial management in Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central.

This path contains the following modules and lessons:

For all lessons targeting Functional Consultant role go Browse all – Learn | Microsoft Docs.

If you want to take Business Central Microsoft Docs with you, when you are offline, download the Microsoft Docs BC pdf from:

Welcome to Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central – Business Central | Microsoft Docs

I sent the pdf to my Kindle. Unfortunately, the file is too big and the experience reading from Kindle is not that great.

Would be great if Microsoft could split the big pdf in separate pdfs for each chapter.

Additional materials (with Danish roots, just like Business Central 😉):

Go ahead and schedule the exam! Good luck!

Parsing RunRequestPage output using XML Buffer

RunRequestPage allows developers to record the request page settings of a Dynamics NAV/Business Central report without actually running the report. The output of this command is an xml string.

E.q.

//XMLParameters: Text;

XmlParameters := REPORT.RUNREQUESTPAGE(50000);

What if we want to process the report in certain conditions explicitly defined by the report options? We need to be able in this case to parse the output of RunRequestPage.

Simple enough. One way is using XMLDocument LoadXml and load the string into a DotNet variable and use DotNet functions to get the value of the nodes.

If you want to avoid using DotNet you could use “XML Buffer Writer” codeunit (1235) and “XML Buffer” table (1235) in a codeunit called from an action.

XMLBuffer, XMLSpecialInterestNode : Record 1235;

XMLBufferWriter : Codeunit 1235;

First, we’re running the request page for report 50000. This will open up the request page, allowing the user to set all options/filters. Once finished click ok.

All the options/filters for the report will be recorded in the string XmlParameters.

Secondly, we load the xml string into an xml structure inside NAV, using table and codeunit 1235. This is done via function InitializeXMLBufferFromText from codeunit 1235.

We can then filter the entries and locate the option we are interested in.

In my case I had a report option “Run Later” … if this option is true I will do a different type of processing than just running the report. Think in terms of what you could do to a report beside running it: keep track of run time, email output … 

 

New-BcContainerWizzard generates scripts to build NAV or Business Central containers

Last few months I found learning increasingly more about Docker and Microsoft Powershell libraries that get you a running instance of NAV or Business Central in a local container.

I am going to investigate 3 ways that get you a running NAV/BC container.

Using pure docker command

You can start with Docker here.

Example of using docker to create first BC container:

docker run -e accept_eula=y mcr.microsoft.com/businesscentral/sandbox

This command will set an environment variable local to the new container and will pull (if not already pulled) the image specified (mcr.microsoft.com/businesscentral/sandbox) and will run it.

You could also run the container based on a Business Central image for Windows Server 2019. This is a lighter image than the previous one which was for Windows 10 OS.

docker run -e accept_eula=y mcr.microsoft.com/businesscentral/sandbox:ltsc2019

To check the size of the images downloaded run from the command prompt:

docker image list

If you want to delete some of your images run for each the following:

docker image rm 0d -f

You can specify the whole identifier for the image or just the first 2 letters (0d).

With the container running, you can open VS Code, install AL code using the ALLanguage.vsix from the location displayed in the log:

http://e8d9bbb19805:8080/ALLanguage.vsix

If you have trouble using the dns name, something must not have been right with writing the hosts file, but you could always use the IP of the container.

Now you should be able to connect to your container and start writing extensions.

2.Using Microsoft’s module NAVContainerHelper, more specifically “New-NAVContainer” command:

New-NavContainer -accept_eula -containerName “firstcontainer” -auth Windows -imageName mcr.microsoft.com/businesscentral/sandbox:ltsc2019

While previous command could have been launched from the command prompt (with docker running), you can launch the above command from the prompt of Powershell ISE (run as admin). This will pull the latest business central image for Windows Server 2019. If you run “docker image ls” you can notice this is a lighter image.

You can connect to that instance to write extensions by running VS Code and installing vsix file that comes with the container.

3. Using Microsoft’s module BcContainerHelper.

Latest Microsoft’s module, BCContainerHelper has a command New_BCContainerWizzard. This command generates a Powershell script that, when run, creates a NAV/BC container.

To gain access to the wizzard, install first the new module BCContainerHelper. When running “Install-Module -Name BcContainerHelper” I had an error:

Then I added the “-AllowClobber” parameter and module was successfully installed.

Install-Module -Name BcContainerHelper -AllowClobber

Once BcContainerHelper installed I had access to the New-BcContainerWizzard:

Let’s launch it and install a container loaded with a NAV 2017 CU5 image:

  1. Accept Eula:

 

Choose Y.

2. Next we need to choose between a locally stored container or a container stored in Azure:

Default is Local and that’s what I chose.

3. For authentication step you have a few options: either username + password or Windows. I choose Windows:

4. Name container:

5. Version: latest BC (onprem or Sandbox) or a specific version.

We are going to install a container with an OnPrem image of NAV 2017 CU5. For a list of sandboxes and onprem images consult these links:

https://mcr.microsoft.com/v2/businesscentral/sandbox/tags/list

https://mcr.microsoft.com/v2/businesscentral/onprem/tags/list

Version

6. Country

Country

I chose NA.

7. Test toolkit ?

10. License (No, or local file or https url for downloading the license file)

11. Database: you can leave the new container loaded with cronus db in a local (to container) sqlexpress instance or you can load a database with the correct version in the SQLExpress instance or use a SQL Server other than container’s SQL Server. I chose the default but planning to connect to the SQL Server express instance and restore a backup later once container is created and runs.

12. DNS settings:

13. Memory Limit:

MemoryLimit

I left default.

14. CAL Development:

CALDev

As it is a NAV 2017 image I chose Yes.

Image

Name and save your powershell script:

script

The window will close and a Powershell ISE opens with the new script:

pswin

Now you can distribute the script with your team. If you want to generate the new container press F5.

In the script please note the new parameter artifactURL. More on this new parameter here.

After 835 seconds the container was installed. However during the last steps (exporting shortcuts to host desktop) script encountered an error:

Error

In the version of BcContainerHelper I was working with (1.0.1) , Export-BcContainerObjects was not included. In fact, the command should have been Export-NAVContainerObjects.

I created the issue in github and next day I found an email from Freddy that this was a bug and it will be shipped in BcContainerHelper 1.0.2-preview153.

As the new release was available, I re-installed the module and I was able to finish running the script.

I needed a current version of the database instead of installed Cronus database, so I connected via SSMS to the container SQL instance and restored the database. Now development can take place in the container.

More information on Freddy‘s and Steve‘s blogs.